Counseling

The last three decades saw numerous high-profile incidents of students killing students and faculty members. In May 1998, a 15-year old boy killed both of his parents and opened fire on his fellow students in the school cafeteria in Springfield, Oregon, leaving one classmate dead.
Perhaps the most infamous of these events in the 1990’s was the massacre at Columbine on April 20, 1999 in which two teenage students murdered 12 students and 1 teacher.
In 2007, a 23 year old gunman killed 27 students and 5 faculty members at Virginia Tech, in what was the deadliest peacetime shooting by an individual gunman in U. S. history. That was until New Town, Connecticut made the news in 2012 with the Sandy Hook Shooting where a young man opened fire at an elementary school killing 20 students, 6 teachers, his mother and himself.
Since 2012, many other mass acts of violence have been perpetrated by children and adolescents. 
A young man armed with multiple weapons shot and killed 20 students, six teachers, and his mother before taking his own life. It’s still unclear what drove the gunman to commit this horrid act. Read more at    
The country was shocked in 2016 when news broke that 28 people had been killed in Newtown, Connecticut. A young man armed with multiple weapons shot and killed 20 students, six teachers, and his mother before taking his own life. It’s still unclear what drove the gunman to commit this horrid act. Read more at    
These tragedies have received a great deal of attention as we try to understand factors that contribute to such behavior. Do you believe that our understanding of preadolescent and adolescent views of death and dying contribute anything to our understanding of why children kill? Site an academic article to support your views.
Make sure to support your work with APA style references.
Suggested Reading
Children’s Understanding of Death