HDFS 6003: Literature Table A Small-Scale Scoping Review of Forgiveness in Infidelity

HDFS 6003: Literature Table
A Small-Scale Scoping Review of Forgiveness in Infidelity among (Christian and Non-Christian) Couples in the relationship
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Instructions: Complete this table by including relevant information from each of your ten (10) scholarly (empirical articles). Hint: if your results section is very long, include only the results that answer the main research questions or purpose. Try to paraphrase as much as possible so that when you are integrating the results, you are already processing the studies in your own voice.
Article
APA Citation (does not need to include hanging indent)
Sample size
Sample characteristics
Research Question or Purpose
Methods (design, measures or data sources, analytic strategy)
Results (if purely quantitative, include text that describes how the results are meaningful)
Interesting or controversial implications (this is what will lead to the ”gap” you are investigating)
#1
Forgiving the Unforgivable: Couples’ Forgiveness and Expected
Forgiveness of Emotional and Sexual Infidelity From an Error
Management Theory Perspective
Bendixen, M., Kennair, L. E., & Grøntvedt, T. V. (2018). Forgiving the unforgivable: Couples’ forgiveness and expected forgiveness of emotional and sexual infidelity from an error management theory perspective. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 12(4), 322–335. https://doi.org/10.1037/ebs0000110
A total of 92 heterosexual couples studying at
the Norwegian University of Science and Technology
partook in this study. Their age ranged
from 19–30 years (women: M 22.0; SD
1.8; men: M 22.9; SD 2.2). Mean length of
current relationships was reported to be 21
months (ranging from 1 month to 9 years, SD
19 months) by both parties (r .988).
Scenarios covered emotional as well as
sexual infidelity, and one’s own as well as one’s
partner’s hypothetical transgressions. To partake, participants had to
be in a relationship and bring their partner to a
designated lab.
The current study, combines forgiveness bias
(EMT) with theory on evolved sex differences in
jealousy. By testing the current predictions with
couples’ reports of both own and partners’ transgressions
and forgiveness, the current study pro-
332 BENDIXEN, KENNAIR, AND GRØNTVEDT
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vides novel and deeper insights into how men and
women perceive and react to the distress of emotional
and sexual infidelity.
total of
four scenarios for one’s own and one’s partner’s
infidelity respectively. Two of the scenarios reflected
exclusively sexually unfaithful behavior,
the other two reflected exclusively emotionally
unfaithful behavior.
In a recent
study on jealousy using hypothetical scenarios,
(Bendixen, Kennair, & Buss, 2015)
found that sex differences in jealousy for continuous
measures and forced choice measures
were equally strong (d _ .80 –.90) in a large
sample of Norwegian students. This finding
supports previous findings in Scandinavia using
the forced choice method
The hypothetical acts of infidelity committed in
the current scenarios were in general not forgiven.
Infidelity, whether emotional or sexual, is not easily
forgiven; it is probably one of the most severe
transgressions one may commit toward one’s partner.
What is most striking with our results is how
men do not quite understand how serious women
perceive and deem emotional infidelity to be;
while men cannot be described as naïve about this
aspect of their relationship, they certainly are not
as concerned with emotional infidelity as women
are.
#2
Lambert, N. M., Fincham, F. D., LaVallee, D. C., & Brantley, C. W. (2012). Praying together and staying together: Couple prayer and trust. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, 4(1), 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0023060
#3
Bendixen, M., Kennair, L. E., & Grøntvedt, T. V. (2018). Forgiving the unforgivable: Couples’ forgiveness and expected forgiveness of emotional and sexual infidelity from an error management theory perspective. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 12(4), 322–335. https://doi.org/10.1037/ebs0000110
#4
Chi, P., Tang, Y., Worthington, E., Chan, C., Lam, D., & Lin, X. (2019). Intrapersonal Chi, P., Tang, Y., Worthington, E. L., Chan, C. L., Lam, D. O., & Lin, X. (2019). Intrapersonal and interpersonal facilitators of forgiveness following spousal infidelity: A stress and Coping Perspective. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 75(10), 1896–1915. https://doi.org/10.1002/jclp.22825
#5
Dehghani, M., Aslani, K., Amanelahi, A., & Rajabi, G. (2020). The effectiveness of Attachment Injury Resolution Model (AIRM) on increasing trust among the injured women with marital infidelity: A case study approach. The American Journal of Family Therapy, 48(3), 283–297. https://doi.org/10.1080/01926187.2020.1734883
#6
Johns, K. N., Allen, E. S., & Gordon, K. C. (2015). The relationship between mindfulness and forgiveness of infidelity. Mindfulness, 6(6), 1462–1471. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-015-0427-2
#7
Walsh, C. M., & Neff, L. A. (2019). The importance of investing in your relationship: Emotional Capital and responses to partner transgressions. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 37(2), 581–601. https://doi.org/10.1177/0265407519875225
#8
PANSERA, C. A. R. O. L. I. N. A., & LA GUARDIA, J. E. N. N. I. F. E. R. (2011). The role of sincere amends and perceived partner responsiveness in forgiveness. Personal Relationships, 19(4), 696–711. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-6811.2011.01386.x
#9
Ziv, I., Lubin, O. B.-H., & Asher, S. (2017). “I swear I will never betray you”: Factors reported by spouses as helping them resist extramarital sex in relation to gender, marriage length, and religiosity. The Journal of Sex Research, 55(2), 236–251. https://doi.org/10.1080/00224499.2017.1347602
#10
Heintzelman, A., Murdock, N. L., Krycak, R. C., & Seay, L. (2014). Recovery from infidelity: Differentiation of self, trauma, forgiveness, and posttraumatic growth among couples in continuing relationships. Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice, 3(1), 13–29. https://doi.org/10.1037/cfp0000016