Take-home Topics and Research Questions Worksheet Name: REMEMBER: You must have completed

Take-home Topics and Research Questions Worksheet
Name:
REMEMBER: You must have completed some preliminary research (i.e. Googling, visiting the library, using JStor, and/or other academic research databases) in order to complete this worksheet and develop a strong topic and research questions. Tip: the best topics and research questions are the product of preliminary research and continuous revision.
WRITE DOWN TWO OF YOUR INTERESTS / BROAD TOPICS (usually in 3-5 words):
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EXAMPLE / CASE STUDY: Identify examples of exhibitions, artworks, artists, events, places and/or other case study ideas that interest you in relation to each broad topic above. Identify specific examples, not general categories (e.g. “2019 Whitney Biennial,” not just “contemporary American art,” or “1915 Panama-California Exposition in San Diego,” not just “world’s fairs and expositions” . . . of which there are MANY).
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Using page 37 of The Craft of Research as guidance (the section “From a Broad Topic To a Focused One”), REVISE YOUR INTERESTS INTO FOCUSED TOPICS. Restate your two topic ideas in specific, detailed terms below (usually at least 10 words), but avoid any “claim”-like statements because we’re not there quite yet! Consider including reference to the cases/examples you brainstormed above.
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Next, refer to page 38-43 in The Craft of Research (the section “From a Focused Topic to Questions”). There are different types of research questions that can get you started in finding appropriate sources for your project. Note: speculative questions are great for brainstorming, but “what if” types of inquiries are typically duds when it comes to viable research questions.
For each of your topics, DEVELOP TWO QUESTIONS FROM DIFFERENT CATEGORIES. Again, consider asking research questions pertaining to the specific examples/cases you brainstormed, and don’t forget to use a question mark!
TOPIC 1:
Question 1 –
Question 2 –
TOPIC 2:
Question 1 –
Question 2 –
FROM A QUESTION TO ITS SIGNIFICANCE: Use the three step process on pages 44-46 to complete this section.
Step 1: name your focused topics (“I am working on . . .” “I am studying . . .” “I am analyzing . . .”)
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Step 2: add an indirect question by selecting your favorite of the two research questions you came up with or consider creating a new question that combines both (“. . . because I want to find out . . .”)
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Step 3: answer “So What?” / address significance (“. . . in order to help my reader understand . . .”)
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