Ways of Knowing

NO SOURCES MORE THAN 5 YEARS OLDPreparing the AssignmentNursing knowledge is classified in a variety of ways, one of which is Carper’s Patterns of Knowing (Carper, 1978). Carper’s framework offers a lens through which the nurse can reflect upon insights acquired through empirical, ethical, personal, and aesthetic knowledge (Carper, 1978). Through intentional reflection using Carper’s Patterns of Knowing, nurses can process experiential learning and knowledge acquired through practice. The purpose of this assignment is to reflect upon a specific practice situation and better understand the professional knowledge and insights obtained through that experience.
Criteria for Content
Think of a surprising or challenging practice situation in which you felt underprepared, unprepared, or uncomfortable. ( I WORK IN THE ICU SETTING)Select an important nursing issue/topic that was inherent to the identified situation.Briefly explain the situationIdentify the nursing issue inherent in the identified situationAs a method of refection, use Carper’s Patterns of Knowing to analyze the situation. In your discussion, address ONE of the following Patterns of Knowing:What do you think was the underlying reason for the situation? (Esthetics)What were your thoughts and feeling in the situation? (Personal)What was one personal belief that impacted your actions? (Ethics)What evidence in nursing literature supports the nursing importance of the identified issue? (Empirical)What new insights did you gain through this reflective practice opportunity? How will this apply to your practice as a nurse practitioner? Be sure to use scholarly literature to support your position.
Integration of Evidence: The student post provides support from a minimum of one scholarly in-text citation with a matching reference and assigned readings or online lessons, per discussion topic per week.What is a scholarly resource? A scholarly resource is one that comes from a professional, peer-reviewed publication (e.g., journals and government reports such as those from the FDA or CDC).Contains references for sources citedWritten by a professional or scholar in the field and indicates credentials of the author(s)Is no more than 5 years old for clinical or research articlesWhat is not considered a scholarly resource?Newspaper articles and layperson literature (e.g., Readers Digest, Healthy Life Magazine, Food, and Fitness)Information from Wikipedia or any wikiTextbooksWebsite homepagesThe weekly lessonArticles in healthcare and nursing-oriented trade magazines, such as Nursing Made Incredibly Easy and RNMagazine (Source: What is a scholarly article.docx; Created 06/09 CK/CL Revised: 02/17/11, 09/02/11 nlh/clm)Can the lesson for the week be used as a scholarly source?Information from the weekly lesson can be cited in a posting; however, it is not to be the sole source used in the post.Are resources provided from CU acceptable sources (e.g., the readings for the week)?Not as a sole source within the post. The textbook and/or assigned (required) articles for the week can be used, but another outside source must be cited for full credit. Textbooks are not considered scholarly sources for the purpose of discussions.Are websites acceptable as scholarly resources for discussions?Yes, if they are documents or data cited from credible websites. Credible websites usually end in .gov or .edu; however, some .org sites that belong to professional associations (e.g., American Heart Association, National League for Nursing, American Diabetes Association) are also considered credible websites. Websites ending with .com are not to be used as scholarly resources.